The Hotline, One Year Later

one-year-laterAt this time last year, we were still reeling from the disturbing footage of former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice knocking his then-fiancee unconscious in an elevator. In the month after that footage was released, contacts to The Hotline spiked by 84%, and the media was discussing domestic violence at an unprecedented level. Although resources for domestic violence programs, including The Hotline, were stretched thin, ultimately the event brought a too-often ignored and misunderstood issue to light in new ways.

This week, USA Today profiled The Hotline and showcased a portrait of progress one year later. Thanks to generous contributions from our partners and supporters, including the National Football League, we have been able to hire additional staff and fulfill crucial operational needs in order to accommodate the increase in contact volume we’ve experienced since last September. This summer, with support from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Justice Office for Victims of Crime, the NFL and Mary Kay Inc., we opened an office in Washington, DC, allowing us to expand our digital service capabilities and increase opportunities to be involved in important policy work on The Hill. Thanks to additional resources, over the first seven months of 2015, The Hotline and loveisrespect answered 185,845 contacts, 61,106 more than we did over the same period in 2014. We’ve been able to answer 72% of all contacts, compared to 59% during the same period last year. This means we are getting ever closer to our goal of answering every call, chat and text that we receive.

The conversation around domestic violence has changed over the past year, but there is still much work to do. We still need more education and prevention programs at all levels, and we must keep fighting to eradicate stigmas around victims and survivors. It’s also crucial that we continue strengthening and enforcing laws regarding domestic violence in order to support survivors in the most effective ways.

We believe that whenever someone reaches out for help in a domestic violence situation, they deserve access to compassionate support and resources that meet them where they are. The Hotline’s mission is to be the lifeline that connects all who are affected by abuse to the support and services they need. If you would like to join us in supporting domestic violence survivors, learn more about how you can get involved.

Source: thehotline.org/feed

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